Webinar RCPCH/BPSU series - CATCh-uS before we fall : Transitional care for young adults with ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) was previously seen as a childhood developmental disorder, which meant that adult mental health services have not been set up to support ADHD patients who become too old for child services. This webinar will present the results of the first in-depth study of the transition of ADHD patients from child to adult health services in the UK.
Date: -
Time: -
Spaces available

Free to access

Overview

ADHD was previously seen as a childhood developmental disorder, which meant that adult mental health services have not been set up to support ADHD patients who become too old for child services.  This webinar will present the results of the first in-depth study of the transition of ADHD patients from child to adult health services in the UK.

The study objectives were to explore:

  • How many young people with ADHD are in need of services as an adult?
  • What services are available for young adults with ADHD?
  • How ADHD stakeholders experience transition from child to adult services

In this webinar, Professor Tamsin Ford, Dr Astrid Janssens and Dr Tamsin Newlove-Delgado will describe the findings from this NIHR (National Institute for Health Research) funded, interactive mixed method study and place them in the wider context of service organisations for transition and for neurodevelopmental disorders.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this webinar, delegates will:

  • have evidence to estimate the likely number of young adults in their population who will need transition
  • understand the availability of services for young adults with ADHD and how to access them
  • gain increased  awareness of the impact of untreated ADHD at this crucial life-stage and the need for continued treatment for those that need it
  • understand the likely points for drop out from treatment and how the experience of transition could be improved to prevent loss of service.

Audience

  • Paediatric trainees
  • Community paediatricians
  • GPs and GP trainees
  • Public health trainees and consultants
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry trainees and consultants
  • General adult and Learning disability psychiatry trainees and consultants

It is also suitable for an international audience, with caveats on data (which is UK & Ireland) and treatment approaches which will be most relevant to the UK context.

Speakers

Tamsin Ford CBE is a Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Cambridge, which she joined in October 2019. Her academic work focuses on the effectiveness of interventions and the efficiency of services in relation to the mental health of children and young people, with a particular focus on the interface between the education and health systems. She has been involved in all three national surveys of child and adolescent mental health, has run and supported several large trials of school-based interventions and is an epidemiologist by academic background. She completed her PhD at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London and moved to Exeter where she set up and led the Child Mental Health Research Group between 2007 and 2019. 

Tamsin Newlove-Delgado is a Senior Clinical Lecturer with the Child Mental Health Group at the University of Exeter and an Honorary Consultant in Public Health Medicine. Having spent time training in child psychiatry before moving into public health, Tamsin’s main area of research interest is in public health aspects of child mental health. Her PhD (funded by an NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship) focussed on service provision for children and young people with psychiatric disorders, and on transition in ADHD and prescribing over the transition period. She was a co-investigator on the CATCh-uS project and led the strand on primary care.

Astrid Janssens is Associated Professor in User Perspectives at the University of Southern Denmark, which she joined in January 2019. Her research focuses on health care experiences of service users and providers. She has worked in applied health care research, whilst being trained in Psychology and Anthrophology. Currently, her work has refocused on participation and user and patient involvement in research and evaluation. She was project manager of the CATCh-uS project. 

Relevant references and resources

CATCh-uS study website University of Exeter

Adult ADHD service map in the UK

MindEd - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Recognition and Management

  • Eke, H., Ford, T., Newlove-Delgado, T., Price, A., Young, S., Ani, C., Sayal, K., Lynn, R.M., Paul, M., and Janssens, A. (2019) Transition between child and adult services for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): findings from a British national surveillance study The British Journal of Psychiatry 2019:1-7 doi:org/10.1192/bjp.2019.131
  • Price, A., Janssens, A., Woodley, A.L., Allwood, M., and Ford, T. (2019) Review: Experiences of healthcare transitions for young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review of qualitative research Child and Adolescent Mental Health 24, No. 2, pp. 113–122 doi:10.1111/camh.12297
  • Eke, H., Janssens, A., and Ford, T. (2019) Transition from children’s to adult services: a review of guidelines and protocols for young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in England Child and Adolescent Mental Health 24, No. 2, pp. 123–132 doi.org/10.1111/camh.12301
  • Eke, H., Ford, T., Newlove-Delgado, T., Price, A., Young, S., Ani, C., Sayal, K., Lynn, R. M., Paul, M., and Janssens, A. (2019).Transition between child and adult services for young people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): findings from a British national surveillance study The British Journal of Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–7. doi: 10.1192/bjp.2019.131
  • Eke, H., Janssens, A., Downs, J., Lynn, R., Ani, C., and Ford, T. (2019) How to measure the need for transition to adult services among young people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): a comparison of surveillance versus case note review methods BMC Medical Research Methodology (2019) 19:179. doi.org/10.1186/s12874-019-0820-y
  • Price, A., Janssens, A., Dunn-Morua, S., Eke, H., Asherson, P., Lloyd, T., and Ford, T. (2019) Seven steps to mapping health service provision: lessons learned from mapping services for adults with Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the UK BMC Health Services Research (2019) 19: 468. doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4287-7
  • Newlove-Delgado, T., Blake, S., Ford, T., Janssens A. (2019) Young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in transition from child to adult services: a qualitative study of the experiences of general practitioners in the UK. BMC Fam Pract 20, 159 (2019) doi:10.1186/s12875-019-1046-0
  • Lynn, R. M., Reading, R., & BPSU Ascertainment Group. (2019). Case ascertainment in active paediatric surveillance systems: a report from the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit Ascertainment Group. Arch Dis Child. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2019-317401
  • Eke, H., Janssens, A., Newlove-Delgado, T., Paul, M., Price, A., Young, S., & Ford, T. (2019). Clinician perspectives on the use of NICE guidelines for the process of transition in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Child: care, health and development. doi:10.1111/cch.12718